Monday, March 30, 2009

The Kildare Lodge

We visited this hotel years ago and then neglected it – possibly because it is so close to home – so when we heard it had recently changed hands we decided to have Sunday lunch there. It is a grade 2 listed building in the Arts and Crafts style with many interesting features. Designed by Barry Parker it is one of only a few buildings of this style to be open to the public as a hotel. When we booked we were told we would have lunch in the ‘Lutyens Restaurant’.


We had drinks first in the bar which was lined with casually dressed men clearly enjoying the beer which MTL confirmed was very good. We were brought menus to choose from and MTL chose roast beef with the usual suspects and I chose grilled mullet with lemon, garlic and cream. I asked the man with the menus if the mullet was good; he assured me it was and ‘no bones – you don’t want bones do you?’ He was absolutely right it tasted fine and there were no bones.


When we were shown into the dining room I remembered the first year we were here; we had dined on New Year’s Eve with our youngest son home from University and now with his own family living in France. How time flies. Gradually the restaurant filled up and proved it was a popular place for Sunday lunch. The dessert I chose wasn’t really to my taste – a floppy moussy concoction but our recent trip to the Dragon House elevated desserts to a higher plane.


The weather was cheeringly sunny although chill so we visited our local nursery where we bought three lavenders (mine have given up the ghost after a brutal hacking) Dutch, French and Hidcote. I also bought baby geraniums to nurture until there is no chance of frost. Back in time to watch the lead up to the Boat Race which we always watch together and Oxford won. A good day.

15 comments:

Kanani said...

Pretty!
I like the description: "floppy moussy concoction."

PI said...

Kanani: sadly - indifferent or not I ate every last mouthful.

scarlet-blue said...

Spoilt at the Dragon House!
I often overlook places closer to home. Daft really.
Sx

savannah said...

i've decided that my garden needs lavender, too! am i insane, sugar? i think it will grow here. . .
xoxox

PI said...

Scarlet: you can't mean the Dragon House is close to you. You are much closer to London I think. That would be fun if you were:)
It flourishes in such diverse places as Norfolk and Provence so I think (and my geography is shameful) you stand a pretty good chance.

Crabbers said...

Lavender; little overdemanding, poor, pebbly, dry, even arid lands suit! Water only when the soil is really very dry.
Attention nevertheless with Lavandula stoechas, which begins enduring from - 5 °C.
Lavandula ' Blue scent ' flourishes copiously from the first year! As soon as she can use the full sun

Jimmy Bastard said...

I do like the Regency period decor.. most enticing.

It all sounds very cosy Pat.. good for you hen.

PI said...

Savannah: sorry I'm going dotty . I tagged my comment to you on the end of Scarlet's.
It flourishes in such diverse places as Norfolk and Provence so I think (and my geography is shameful) you stand a pretty good chance.

Crabbers: that's very helpful. Merci bien.

Jimmy: where have you been all the day Jimmy boy Jimmy boy,
Where have you been all the day my Jimmy boy.
Can't remember the rest:)

lom said...

Sounds like a niced day

granny p said...

Never knew this place: it looks interesting - nice food too. Lavender? We have our own wild breed of it here. It doesn't smell quite as strong but is lovely to look at. And it doesn't like ruthless pruning either!

john.g. said...

Looks lovely!

Travelin'Oma said...

The word "lavender" conjures up lace shops, and bed linens at a B & B in the Cotswolds. Somehow the scent of lavender seems more at home in England than in the western desert where I live. The description of your getaway sounds charming.

Queenie said...

I am envious of your hotel trips. My Paramour hates staying in hotels, so we don't. I'd love to but not on my own. Thanks for the vicarious enjoyment!

PI said...

LOM:it was and Oxford winning was the icing on the cake.

Granny.P: if you can remember Friday street its further on, past the garage. I should take cuttings of the lavender but the thrill has gone:)

John.g: I think - like most of the men in my life you would probably prefer one of the country pubs.

Travelling Oma: I love lavender the plant but the manufactured scent is a bit old lady. I bought a bottle and tried spraying it on the linen when I was ironing.

PI said...

Queenie: we didn't stay there - too close to home, although we have stayed in Dunster.