Tuesday, January 02, 2007

MARRIED LIFE

MARRIED LIFE

Story contd.

It wasn’t all a bowl of cherries, I missed my girl friends and the fun we had. Dodie came over each week on her day off and she and William decided to teach me bridge.  This was a pity - card games were very much part of leisure in the fifties and I enjoyed playing (MTL refuses to play Rummy with me anymore as I always win)  but William and Dodie managed to put me off bridge for life.

I used to escape into books and still remember some of the horror of ’Oil’ by Upton Sinclair, during an American novel phase, when babies were thrown into boiling water.  Mary Webb made for  lighter reading with her ‘he threw her into the bracken’ and both ‘Three Men in a Boat’ and ‘Cold Comfort Farm’ with sexy Seth and the old woman who had seen ‘something nasty in the wood shed’ were a delight.

Tennis was an absorbing interest – much more enthralling than watching on television was to hang on the words of Max Robertson’s radio commentaries.  Wimbledon was more exciting with characters like Louise Brough, (’Oh she’s thrown the ball up wrong again!’ Max would groan.) Gorgeous Gussie with her gold lame panties and lovely Jaroslav Drobny – a late bloomer who saved five match points in a 58 game match, finally defeating Ken Rosewall at the age of 32.

I must have been a bit of a pain with my flights of fancy, creative urges and general silliness and William seemed to regard his role in life was to bring me down to earth and put a damper on my enthusiasms.  When we were on a boat – we became a couple but on land it was different.  He could be quite cutting and although I could give as good as I got, it was a downer and I felt my confidence being eroded.  I couldn’t believe it when a friend said how proud William was of me.  Sadly I was unaware of it.

With hindsight I think I should have been more economical with the truth when I told him how I felt about Jamie.  Jamie was never mentioned and I didn’t consciously think of him but I had a recurring dream where I was walking along the bank of a wide river.  In the distance on the opposite bank I saw Jamie walking towards me.  As he got closer I stopped to see what he would do but he just walked on past ignoring me

I made two new girl friends who both worked in shops.  Lily who worked in her father’s newsagent’s shop was pretty, bubbly and a bit ditsy.  Her fiancée was an undergrad at Oxford which stirred a few memories.  I really enjoyed being silly and light hearted with her.  Carol was more serious and managed an antique shop.  She had worked on the bow-fronted chest of drawers that Dodie had given us.  She was boyish, very practical and a gifted furniture restorer and had made a great job of the drawers – repairing some damage, polishing the mahogany and fitting elegant brass handles.  She also guided me through the tricky business of making pelmets with velvet, buckram and gold bobbles.

They both helped me get over my occasional down times.  I saw Lily most days when I picked up a newspaper.  At the end of the summer she said she was thinking of joining the S.A.P.S – The Sale Amateur Players and was I interested?  They were about to produce a play by Somerset Maugham ‘Before the Party’ and would I like to go with her to the audition next week.  Would I?  Just try stopping me!

13 comments:

Ex-Shammickite said...

Interesting story.... keep going!

kenju said...

Yes, keep going! I think you're getting to a really good part, aren't you?

PI said...

Judy: I try not to think ahead too much and let it unfold. Maybe I should. It's a bit of a journey for me and it helps me to have a bettter understanding.

apprentice said...

Mmm I find it hard to warm to William. I don't like to think of you being stifled. Being chipped away like that is demoralising.

Did the acting lead to the modelling? I suppose I'll have to wait and see.

R. Sherman said...

My parents played bridge and I learned the game (sort of) when I was twelve. I found I didn't have the energy to remember all the bidding conventions and so I just yelled "Three NO TRUMP" every hand until they wouldn't invite me to play anymore.

Cheers.

Claire said...

This is a really interesting story! Thanks for sharing.

PI said...

apprentice: like most marriages the result was a 50/50 thing. It must have been difficult with the idea of Jamie looming - even though unmentioned. William wasn't a baddy and though, ultimately to the casuaal observer I was, I still maintain it was a 50/50 thing. The answer to your last question is yes you'll have to wait and see. Don't hit me please!


Randall: there is something about learning how to play bridge which makes one want to behave outrageously and I'm afraid I did.

Claire: delighted to have you along.

OldHorsetailSnake said...

"Keep me reasonably sweet." Now that is one heck of a resolution, assuming one is sweet to start out with. If not, well, what the heck....

PI said...

Hoss; you've spotted a flaw in a nun's modesty. Trust you - you rascal!

Guyana-Gyal said...

"William seemed to regard his role in life was to bring me down to earth and put a damper on my enthusiasms." I once dated someone similar. I was not happy during that time, I can tell you, Pat.

PI said...

GG: you understand then. I think in my case it was prompted by insecurity but I'm sure you agree: enthusiasm should not be dampened. There's too little of it around.

Guyana-Gyal said...

Yes, I understand Pat. It was a most depressing time. That sort of person can make you insecure.

I know now too how good it is to have someone encourage me, is patient and doesn't think I'm the least mad.

PI said...

GG: that's great!